Rollenspiele mit und für Kinder

Durro-Dhun

Erklär(wer)bär
Hi Leute,


aus gegebenem Anlass, weil DriveThroughRPG momentan gerade Werbung dafür macht, habt ihr schon einmal Erfahrungen gemacht mit Rollenspielen für und mit Kindern?


Hier der Newsletter:
What are you doing this weekend?
How about planning a campaign... with your kids?
There can be no doubt that ours is an aging hobby, but it's also true that more and more of you are bringing your kids to the conventions, the game stores, and having them hovering around the game table, asking that heartstring-tugging question -
"Can I play?"
We here at DriveThruRPG have teamed up with some extraordinary people across the gaming culture to push forward a new idea, one that celebrates parents bringing their children into this wonderful hobby of ours, as well as honoring all those who work with kids through gaming to make their lives brighter and full of imagination. We'd like to encourage each and every one of you to get involved and help us spread this vital message for our hobby and community. Some ways you can get involved include:

• Check out Notes from the Experts on our Facebook Page.
• Post your own stories and testamonials on Facebook, as well. Or join us on our new Google+ Page, if you like.
• Join us by "attending" the Event on Facebook.
• Take a look at the various postings all over the net by our Affiliates, like this one on the One Year blog.
• Perhaps you'd like to just grab some kid-friendly games, like this sample selection?


And, of course, please spread the word! We think this is a powerful and important message to share with everyone, and we'd greatly appreciate your involvement. Let's get the kids rolling the dice and sharing what we love - they really are the future of our hobby.

Part of our efforts revolve around getting respected professionals and experts to chime in with some great advice and stories about getting kids to game. We're thrilled to have Bill Walton, one of the RPG hobby's greatest advocates and the master of The Escapist, present a wonderful essay on the subject -

A Few Tips for Roleplaying with Kids
Getting kids involved in tabletop roleplaying games is incredibly rewarding - not only because you are bringing young people into a creative, engaging hobby that keeps their minds active, but also because you are helping the hobby itself thrive among future generations.

But, it's also a bit challenging. Running RPGs for young people takes a bit of special preparation. Kids don't necessarily respond to the same sort of roleplaying sessions that adults do. It's not always easy to keep them interested and participating in the story. And their parents may have some concerns about what goes on during your game sessions.

Here are just a few tips and suggestions for anyone who feels that they are up to the challenge, in three general topics - Preparing an RPG for kids, changing your GM style to suit younger players, and keeping parents comfortable with the hobby.

Preparing an RPG for kids

As with adult gamers, it is always a good idea to have a discussion with your prospective players about what sort of game they'd like to play. With kids, this will mostly be about genre - fantasy, sci-fi, superheroes, and so on. Find something that your entire group can agree on, or come as close as possible. Once you have agreed on a genre, discuss what types of characters your players would like to play. (Tip: Pre-teen kids generally like to portray teenaged characters. If they don't think of it themselves, suggest it.)

Do most of the character creation process yourself (based on their character concept), rather than letting them make all of the decisions, at least for the first session you play with them. This will save a bit of time, and keep interest high as you dive directly into the action. If some or all of your players show an interest in making their own characters from scratch, that can be an incentive to have them back for future games.

Make custom character sheets for your players. Keep information to a minimum, and stick to just the bits that will be used most often during the game. Leave off skills that the character doesn't have, for example. Simplicity and legibility are key here.

Have a list of NPC names handy for those times when the PCs wander off of the story and start talking to shopkeepers or random passersby. One tool that may help you here is the Everyone Everywhere List, a comprehensive list of names from various cultures around the world.

How to change your GM style for kids versus adults

Once you're ready to run your game, you'll want to start thinking about how running an RPG for kids is different than running one for adults. Here are some pointers on adjusting your GMing style accordingly:

- Limit your play sessions to around two hours. From my experience, this is the perfect amount of time to keep their interest, and leave them wanting more at the end.

- Create opportunities for every character to shine, even if it means creating those opportunities on the fly. If the party has a rogue, make sure there are locks to pick and traps to disarm. It may help to have a list of the characters and their special abilities with you behind your GM screen.

- Make sure every player is involved and having fun. Find some way to draw them in if they aren't - this is where your improvisation skills will really be put to the test. Have an NPC approach them with some vital information, or drop a highly prized item into their lap - anything to get them into the action.

- Ham it up! Kids love it! Use props (but make sure they're safe), do voices for every character, make (or buy) actual puzzles for the players (as their characters) to solve in order to open that locked door or find another clue for their quest.

- Don't allow player-versus-player combat or conflict, when possible. There are times when you may feel you have the right group of players to do so - but until then, just encourage teamwork, and try to avoid any hurt feelings.

Kids don't like to hear "No" when they ask for something. Consider using the "Yes, but..." style of GMing, in which you answer every request with a "Yes," but also include some kind of limitation to certain requests. You can find out more about this style of play from a collection of Robin Laws' column See Page XX.

How to keep parents comfortable with the hobby

General acceptance of the roleplaying hobby has come pretty far in the last thirty years or so, but there are still some parents who may have some bad information on what RPGs are and what really happens at a gaming session. Others may have a better understanding, but still have some concerns about the activity. It's up to you to inform them, and make them more comfortable about what you are hoping to accomplish.

The best way to accomplish this is to have them attend a game with your regular gaming group. See if they are willing to participate, and if they are, run a one-shot adventure for them.

If you think you may need help explaining the hobby to them, consider sending them to www.theescapist.info - this is a site I have set up to explain the basics of the hobby to newcomers. If they express concerns about roleplaying based on some of the old misconceptions and urban legends that have collected over the years, have them look at the Basic Gaming FAQ at the main Escapist site - it addresses these legends and explains the true story behind them.

Explain the benefits of the hobby (I have a video on YouTube right here that may help), and if your gaming group tends to include adult themes, be certain to explain that these themes will not be a part of any game that you run for their children.

Bear in mind that some parents may not be comfortable with certain elements of fantasy games, such as supernatural themes. Always respect their concerns, and let them know that there are plenty of alternatives.

And there you have it - just enough information to get you started at running adventure games for kids. You can find more RPG advocacy resources on my website - theescapist.com - and more tips and advice on running RPGs for kids, plus an extensive list of suggested RPGs, at The Young Person's Adventure League.

If you have any other advice to share, or would like to share your experiences with running RPGs with kids, feel free to email me at [email protected]
Hier die beworbenen Produkte:

Adventures in Oz:

Adventures in Oz: Fantasy Roleplaying Beyond the Yellow Brick Road - F. Douglas Wall Publishing | DriveThruRPG.com



Happy Birthday Robot!

Happy Birthday, Robot! - Evil Hat Productions, LLC | DriveThruRPG.com

Argyle & Crew

Argyle & Crew - Adventure in the Land of Skcos - Troll in the Corner | DriveThruRPG.com


Ich persönlich bin etwas zwiespältig: Mein eigener Sohnemann ist jetzt 6 - sicherlich noch etwas jung dafür - aber trotzdem finde ich die Vorstellung, dass er bereits in jungen Jahren Rollenspielt wesentlich beruhigender, als wenn er sich mit Computer- oder Consolenspielen beschäftigen würde...

Habt ihr schon Erfahrungen mit (euren?) Kindern bezüglich Rollenspiel gemacht?
Was haltet ihr von den oben vorgestellten Produkten bzw der "neuen Zielgruppe" Kinder?

Grüße,
Durro
 

Skar

Dr. Spiele
Teammitglied
Administrator
AW: Rollenspiele mit und für Kinder

Meiner ist auch 6. Ich hab meinem Kleinen früher gerne "Spielbücher" erzählt. Also selbst ausgedachte Geschichten mit Wahlmöglichkeit für ihn, wie es weitergehen sollte.

Mittlerweile mit 6 dürfte sein Anspruch aber recht hoch sein und da wäre es wohl schon richtig "Arbeit" da was zu konstruieren.
Rollenspiel hab ich mit ihm noch nicht probiert, aber zB mal Fairy Tale oder andere Spiele angesehen. Macht mich aber noch nicht an. Ich bleib dann vorerst bei Abenteuergeschichten. Da muss man meiner Meinung gewisse Klassiker erstmal vorlegen. (Ich lese meinem Sohn jeden Abend vor.) Die Nibelungen, Moby Dick, Robinson Crusoe, aber auch Gullivers Reisen oder Baron Münchhausen werden gerne genommen. Natürlich auch aktuelle Bücher, da gibt es auch sehr gute, aber m.E. eben kein Muss.

Für Empfehlungen bin ich immer zu haben. :)
 

Ascaso

Partysan
AW: Rollenspiele mit und für Kinder

ansich prima, aber ... ich denke es ist in dem fall wichtig sich selbst nochmal klar zu machen was man da will. wenn ich beispielsweise mit 10 jährigen spiele habe ich nun mal nicht mit "mitspielern" zutun. wenn es mir darum geht mit freunden am spieltisch ein rpg zu zocken sollte ich mir gleichaltrigen (erwachsene) personen suchen mit denen ich das machen kann.
wenn ich mir darüber bewust bleiben kann das ich in dem fall weiter die verantwortung habe und den kindern die möglichkeit bieten muss auf ihrer ebene (und nicht auf meiner) im spiel zu agieren sehe ich da kein problem. wenn ich aber vor allem selber mal wieder lust habe zu zocken ... sollte ich das mit freunden statt (meine) kindern machen.

@Skar
wie wärs mit "die brautprinzessin" oder "harun und das meer der geschichten".
 

Durro-Dhun

Erklär(wer)bär
AW: Rollenspiele mit und für Kinder

Mir ist schon klar, dass man für sich selbst nicht das gleiche Spielgefühl entwickelt bzw. den gleichen Anspruch haben kann wie mit seinen erwachsenen Kumpels. Deswegen ja dieses Thema hier. Ein Rollenspiel kindgerecht zu erzählen muss auch bedeuten, eine Geschichte kindgerecht zu erzählen... und ein kindgerechtes System mit kindgerechten Entscheidungen zu bieten.

Beispielsweise bin ich am Überlegen, ob es dann nicht relativ sinnvoll wäre, ein aggressionsloses Rollenspiel (also ohne Schwerpunktsetzung auf Kampf) anzubieten... oder vielleicht sogar Spielraum dafür zu lassen, aber dem Kind auch die Konsequenzen der Aggression aufzeigen...
 

Ascaso

Partysan
AW: Rollenspiele mit und für Kinder

Mir ist schon klar, dass man für sich selbst nicht das gleiche Spielgefühl entwickelt bzw. den gleichen Anspruch haben kann wie mit seinen erwachsenen Kumpels. Deswegen ja dieses Thema hier. Ein Rollenspiel kindgerecht zu erzählen muss auch bedeuten, eine Geschichte kindgerecht zu erzählen... und ein kindgerechtes System mit kindgerechten Entscheidungen zu bieten.

das weisst du, das weiss ich.

Beispielsweise bin ich am Überlegen, ob es dann nicht relativ sinnvoll wäre, ein aggressionsloses Rollenspiel (also ohne Schwerpunktsetzung auf Kampf) anzubieten... oder vielleicht sogar Spielraum dafür zu lassen, aber dem Kind auch die Konsequenzen der Aggression aufzeigen...

hmmm ja, aber würde ich auch nicht überpädagogisieren. hier und da ein wenig "halt" bieten und den vorhandenen "raum" gleich gross für alle machen, sollte ansich genügen. üblicherweise kennt man ja die (eigenen) kinder.
 

ThePinkAxolotl

Halbgott
AW: Rollenspiele mit und für Kinder

Ich finde das echt super! Aber wie Durro-Dhun schon sagte:

Ein Rollenspiel kindgerecht zu erzählen muss auch bedeuten, eine Geschichte kindgerecht zu erzählen... und ein kindgerechtes System mit kindgerechten Entscheidungen zu bieten.

Eine große Herausforderung. Ich selbst habe beruflich recht viel damit zu tun und man sollte da schon auf einiges achten, damit die Kleinen auch ihren Spaß dabei haben.

Ob ein Kind mit 6 Jahren zu jung ist oder nicht, hängt wohl hauptsächlich, glaube ich, viel von dem Kind ab. Aber das Rollenspiel fördert so viele wichtige Sachen, wie Problemlösung, Teamgeist,
andere ausredenlasen und natürlich Fantasie, dass man das eigentlich nur unterstützen kann :)

Ob man "Kämpfe" spielt ist da schon ein schwereres Thema. Ab einem bestimmten Alter, denke ich sollte man das schon rein bringen. Auch hier stimme ich voll und ganz Durro-Dhun zu.
Alles hat seine Konsequenzen und man muss mit denen fertig werden. Aber natürlich auf kind- und altergerechtem Niveau :) Statt gleich was mit dem Zweihänder auf die Nase geht es hier
in Richtung Haare ziehen von einer wütenden Fee als Konsequenz im Rollenspiel. Wichtiger als "Schaden" finde ich hier den Kindern zu zeigen, dass sie gerade etwas gemacht haben, was nicht
in Ordnung war und das man etwas anders lösen kann und so alle Parteien zufrieden sind.

Mich würde interessieren welche Genre bzw Settings ihr da so im Auge habt :) ???
Das "adventures in OZ" sieht schon ziemlich cool aus...
 
D

Deleted member 7518

Guest
AW: Rollenspiele mit und für Kinder

Meine Eltern haben mit mir DSA gespielt, als ich etwa 8 war (nach irgendwelchen einfachen Starter-Regeln).
Meine Mutter hat geleitet, und mein Vater und ich haben gespielt.
War eigentlich ganz lustig, auch wenn wir das nicht oft gemacht haben. Gewaltfrei war es zwar nicht ganz, aber doch vergleichsweise gewaltarm. ;)

Und mein Freund hat als Kind von seinem großen Bruder die Einsamer Wolf Bücher vorgelesen bekommen und durfte dann immer die Entscheidungen treffen. Hat ihm immer gut gefallen und ihn ans Hobby rangeführt. ^^

Wenn man dafür dann noch ein speziell zugeschnittenes System und Setting hat, wäre das sicher bei einer Gruppe aus ein paar mehr Kindern eine Idee wert.
Man muss sich nur auf ihre Ebene begeben, und sollte fähig sein sowas in einfachen, verständlichen Worten zu erzählen.
 

Skar

Dr. Spiele
Teammitglied
Administrator
AW: Rollenspiele mit und für Kinder

Mich würde interessieren welche Genre bzw Settings ihr da so im Auge habt :) ???
Das "adventures in OZ" sieht schon ziemlich cool aus...
Alles klassische. Den Zauberer von Oz kennt er zum Beispiel, würde ich aber nicht wählen. Eher Fantasy, wie man sie aus Sagen und Märchen kennt.

"Dinosaurier" geht natürlich auch immer. ;)
 

Sadric

Sethskind
AW: Rollenspiele mit und für Kinder

Kommt natürlich immer auf das Alter der Kinder an.
Ich hatte einige Male mit meinen Sohn im Alter von ca. 8 jahren gespielt. Er wollte halt auch spielen wenn ich meine Runde vorbereitet habe, Pappminiaturen oder gelände gebastelt habe. Meistens war es nur eine Szene, Miniaturen aufgestellt, Geländeteile drapiert und ein Kampf. Als Gegner habe ich besonders gerne Untote, Statuen oder sowas gewählt-ein Skelett das er zerschmettert erschien mir harmloser als einen Ork zu töten.
Denn eines war ihm schon damals klar-ein besiegter Gegner ist TOT! Du kannst noch so oft betonen daß der Gegner flüchtet, ohnmächtig oder einfach "besiegt" ist, für ihn war der Gegner tot.

Deswegen habe ich das dann wieder einschlafen lassen, bis er mit 12 Jahren mit einigen Kumpels spielen wollte.

Und in dem Alter sind Kämpfe für die Jungs wichtig.
Zuviel Gerede und sie machen Blödsinn. ;-)
 

Orakel

DiplFrK
AW: Rollenspiele mit und für Kinder

Mangels des Zustands der "Elternschaft" kann ich zu dem Thema natürlich nichts beisteuern, was eigene Erfahrung anbelangt.

Allerdings erinnere ich mich noch düster, dass Sam Chups in seinem Podcast "The Bear's Grove" vor Jahren mal eine extrakolumne iengerichtet hatte, wo er von seinen Erfahrungen mit dem Rollenspiel mit und für Kinder erzählt hat.

Moment, ich google mal kurz, ob das Ding noch existiert... Hmm. Scheinbar gabs zwischenzeitlich auch noch einen weiteren Podcast von dem Typen, der sich explizit mit dem Thema Kinder und Rollenspiel auseinandersetzt/gesetzt hat. (Wie gesagt: Keine Ahnung, ob das Ding noch läuft/Existiert.)

New Main Page
 

ThePinkAxolotl

Halbgott
AW: Rollenspiele mit und für Kinder

Alles klassische. Den Zauberer von Oz kennt er zum Beispiel, würde ich aber nicht wählen. Eher Fantasy, wie man sie aus Sagen und Märchen kennt.

"Dinosaurier" geht natürlich auch immer. ;)

Ach, was war ich als Kind auf Dinosaurier so scharf! Problematisch dürfte da allerdings sein, dass man dann dauernd von den Kinder verbessert wird, wenn man eine Dinoart falsch ausspricht ^^
Auf jeden Fall witzig wäre auch ein komplettes Zeitreise Setting...

Ich denke, Sagen und Märchen würde mir auch besser gefallen als etwas konkretes, dass es schon als Roman oder Filmvorlage gibt. Wobei so eine Art TintenherzRollenspiel Runde vielleicht auch ganz cool wäre...
 

Skar

Dr. Spiele
Teammitglied
Administrator
AW: Rollenspiele mit und für Kinder

Btw. Mein Sohn kann original wie ein T-Rex auf Jagd laufen und seine Kumpel damit erschrecken. Wollt euch diese Meisterleistung meines Blutes nicht vorenthalten.
 

Jace Beleren

ist raus aus diesem Laden. Genug ist genug.
AW: Rollenspiele mit und für Kinder

Ich persönlich bin etwas zwiespältig: Mein eigener Sohnemann ist jetzt 6 - sicherlich noch etwas jung dafür - aber trotzdem finde ich die Vorstellung, dass er bereits in jungen Jahren Rollenspielt wesentlich beruhigender, als wenn er sich mit Computer- oder Consolenspielen beschäftigen würde...
Du konservativer Kleingeist. Du kaufst der Medienlandschaft tatsächlich unreflektiert die Panikmache in Bezug auf Computer- und Konsolenspiele ab.
Das ist traurig, erst recht aufgrund deiner schlechten Orthographie.
 

Lethrael

Schreiberling
AW: Rollenspiele mit und für Kinder

also ich spiele regelmäßig Rollenspiele in einer Bibliothek mit einer Zielgruppe von zwölf bis sechzehn.
Bisher buntze ich klassische Märchenthemen und versuche den Kampf nicht gegen Menschen zu richten.
 

Durro-Dhun

Erklär(wer)bär
AW: Rollenspiele mit und für Kinder

also ich spiele regelmäßig Rollenspiele in einer Bibliothek mit einer Zielgruppe von zwölf bis sechzehn.
Bisher buntze ich klassische Märchenthemen und versuche den Kampf nicht gegen Menschen zu richten.

Und gibt es dabei irgendwelche Tabus? Bzw. 'drückst du den Kindern bei erzieherische Aspekte auf', oder können die da machen was sie wollen?

Zugegebenermaßen ist aber 12 bis 16 auch eine reifere Zielgruppe...
 

Lethrael

Schreiberling
AW: Rollenspiele mit und für Kinder

Teils teils,

meine Mitspielleiter sind bei den älteren schon etwas freier, aber bestimmte Erzieherische Aspekte wie Moral und richtiges Verhalten werden auch von uns gefordert.
Mein persönliches Tabu besteht darin, dass ich nach dem ersten Spiel als die Spieler gegen Menschen gekämpft haben, ich sie nicht mehr gegen Menschen kämpfen wollte.
 
Oben Unten